PHOTO / TEXT PACKAGES

Here are some stories I developed, wrote and photographed

These magazine stories arose from my observations, commitment to organic and sustainable gardening, passion, curiosity, random encounters and hard-earned experience in gardens and kitchens, on the road and in nature.

2016-09-07T12:57:32-04:00

Carpet Your Earth

Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Guide

There’s no need to plant invasive or boring groundcovers with these attractive, problem-solving garden-worthy colonizers.

 

2016-09-07T12:58:19-04:00

Grow Gorgeous Greens

Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Guide

Cold-hardy greens that prefer cool weather give me the fixings for salads and healthful, delicious stir fries, soups and casseroles well into winter and again in early spring. Sometimes fall plantings even overwinter, right under the snow.

2016-09-07T12:59:14-04:00

Setting Down Roots on a Slippery Slope

Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Guide

When I call my back yard a garden for mountain goats, people think I’m kidding until they see for themselves. Here are tips, tricks and strategies for gardening on a slope, and how I learned to make an uphill struggle easier.

2016-08-26T11:13:21-04:00

Many Shades of Green

Westchester Home

A couple’s 25-year collaboration with legendary landscape architect Patrick Chasse brought into being 70 acres of intriguing spaces and carefully edited views on an idyllic country property.

 

2020-07-01T15:51:09-04:00

The Naturescaping Workbook

Timber Press West Coast landscape designer Beth O’Donnell Young teamed up with East Coast gardener and garden photographer Karen Bussolini to teach homeowners how to landscape more sustainably by working with rather than against nature.

2016-08-26T10:35:44-04:00

Every Yard Counts

Wildflower

(The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

Sustainable landscaping isn’t so hard, and every yard can have a positive environmental effect. Here’s how I transformed a sterile front yard in a suburban neighborhood into a beneficial and beautiful habitat for wildlife and people alike. This is my manifesto and life’s purpose as an eco-friendly garden coach – anyone can do it!

2016-08-26T10:38:04-04:00

Hold Your Ground

Wildflower

(The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

Filling every niche with a native plant to cover ground is an important part of sustainable landscaping. Problem spots and tricky niches can become low maintenance wildlife friendly places of beauty with the right plant in the right place.

2016-09-07T13:02:26-04:00

Alien Invaders

Wildflower

(The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

Invasive plants aren’t just garden thugs, they displace native plants and the wildlife that depends on them, change growing conditions and disrupt entire ecosystems. Here’s how to recognize and manage some bad actors.

2016-09-07T13:03:11-04:00

Get A Move On

Wildflower

(The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

Some plants just sit there and don’t do anything. Others move with the slightest breeze, or have such dynamic character that they look like they’re moving even when they’re not. Here are some of my favorite native plants that add pizzazz and a sense of movement to any garden.

2016-09-07T13:04:37-04:00

For the Birds

Wildflower

(The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

How to sustain birds through the winter? With a little planning and lots of native plants, any yard can be a richly diverse bird habitat cleverly disguised as a pleasing home landscape, even during the coldest months.

2016-09-07T13:03:56-04:00

Great Bulbs That Last

The American Gardener

(The American Horticultural Society)

Ecological landscaping means conserving resources, including our own time. Fill every niche and plant a layered landscape so there’s no room for weeds, and you get to enjoy beauty in all seasons. Bulbs that get eaten or wimp out after a year or so aren’t my idea of low-maintenance energy efficient landscaping, so I’ve come to treasure bulbs that last, perennial bulbs that increase over time. Plant these survivors in the right place and enjoy spring flowering bulbs year after year.

 

2016-09-07T13:06:05-04:00

Gardening by Subtraction With Self-Sowers

The American Gardener

(The American Horticultural Society)

I increasingly value plants that self-sow to fill empty spaces in the garden. They make unexpected color combinations, provide seeds for wildlife and increase genetic diversity. My reliable favorites germinate year after year without becoming pests, and are easy to pull out where I don’t want them. Great gardeners and ecological landscapers share tips on good plants for naturalizing and tips for encouraging them to germinate.

 

2016-09-07T13:06:54-04:00

Creating a Moving Experience

The American Gardener

(The American Horticultural Society)

Some gardens have an almost magnetic pull. They invite you to enter, direct pace of passage, draw you through various spatial experiences and keep you wondering what’s around the next curve. The most exciting gardens combine plants that move or have dynamic gestures plus design elements that create a sense of flow.

 

2016-09-07T13:09:11-04:00

Sound in the Garden

The American Gardener

(The American Horticultural Society)

Gardens are an all-out sensory experience. Much attention is paid to cultivating the visual aspects and scent in the garden. But I’ve noticed that many of my garden travel memories are sound-memories. Paying attention to sound while visiting gardens across the country and talking with their creators (about sound versus noise, for instance) made me appreciate the soundscape at home and inspired me to create opportunities for experiencing sound through the seasons in my own garden.

 

2016-09-07T13:09:52-04:00

Taking Cues From Nature

The American Gardener

(The American Horticultural Society)

Ecological landscape designer Larry Weaner has one foot firmly planted in the world of horticulture and one in the science of ecology. He creates artful self-sustaining communities of native plants in partnership with nature and is changing the way we all think about gardens. Look for his new book, Garden Revolution, to which I’m proud to have contributed photographs.

 

2016-09-07T13:10:31-04:00

Plants on the Rocks

The American Gardener

(The American Horticultural Society)

Rocks, whether glacial boulders, bedrock outcrops or gravel, speak powerfully of place – especially when colonized by native plants adapted to rocky habitats. Inspired by plant communities in nature, I’ve dug into plants that survive in and soften stone in our built landscapes, and collected tips for planting in places too rocky to dig.

 

2016-09-07T13:11:15-04:00

The Carbon Connection

Wildflower

(The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)

Ecology requires seeing the big picture while focusing on the specific and thinking across boundaries. Biogeochemist William Schlesinger, in this interview before his retirement as director of The Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies, introduced me to the term “Translational Ecology.” His statement of purpose – “Unless the discoveries of ecological science are rapidly translated into meaningful actions, they will remain quietly archived while the biosphere degrades.” – helped me define my purpose – to translate ecology into action in our own backyards, one yard at a time.

2016-08-26T11:04:14-04:00

Branching Out

This Old House magazine

Artist Thyrza Whittemore has developed artful ways of making plant supports for her garden. Learn her tips and tricks for twig trellises.